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Your employee's injured himself again. What you must do if you think he's taking advantage.

by , 17 June 2014
Accidents happen and occasionally you need to provide compensation for an employee injured on duty. Unfortunately, sometimes you'll get an employee who appears to be taking advantage of this. So, here's how to handle employees who are always injured on duty

Dear reader,

Accidents happen and occasionally you need to provide compensation for an employee injured on duty. This means you might have to pay compensation or be flexible with their work performance, and work hours.  

Unfortunately, sometimes you'll get an employee who appears to be taking advantage of this.

This is the employee who declines treatment or doesn't co-operate with management on site. Even if the doctor recommends light duty (so she is still able to work), she stays of work whenever she feels like it.

While it's necessary to protect your business, you also need to ensure you follow the correct disciplinary methods.

What recourse do you have as an employer?

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How to handle employees who are always injured on duty

If the doctor has cleared her to work light duty, you've adjusted her work to light duty and she doesn't attend work or present herself for treatment you can take disciplinary action for poor work performance or poor time keeping.

If your employee claims her poor work performance is because of her injury on duty you can request a second doctor's opinion on her 'fitness to work'.  

The company should select the doctor and cover the cost of the consultation. If the second doctor deems her fit to work, she must return to work in the capacity he's diagnosed i.e. light work duty or normal work.  

If she's unfit to work and is unlikely to recover sufficiently to be able to return to work, you need to handle the case as one of poor work performance on medical grounds and follow your incapacity procedure.

Regards

Rachel Paterson
Business Publisher


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