HomeHome SearchSearch MenuMenu Our productsOur products

What's the difference between a competent person and Approved Inspection Authorities?

by , 14 January 2014
Did you know there's a difference between a 'competent person' and 'Approved Inspection Authorities'? Read on to find out what it is so you can fully comply with the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA).

According to the Health & Safety Advisor, the Principal Act and some of the regulations refer to 'Approved Inspection Authorities', while other regulations speak of 'competent persons'.

The definition of who constitutes an 'Approved Inspection Authority' or a 'competent person' differs depending on the regulations under consideration.

Let's take a look so you can understand the requirements in the different sets of regulations.

So how does a competent person and approved inspection authorities differ?

#1: The Principal Act defines an Approved Inspection Authority as follows: Inspection authority approved by the chief inspector. However, such an authority must be approved for that particular service.

#2: Major hazard installation regulation 5 says a competent person is an Approved Inspection Authority competent to express an opinion on the risks associated with the major hazard installation.

#3: Explosives regulations say a competent person is a person with sufficient training and experience in, and knowledge of, the health and safety aspects of explosives.

These must be deemed appropriate by the National Explosive council or any other organisation approved by the chief inspector of occupational health and safety.

#4: Construction regulations define a competent person as any person with the knowledge, training, experience and qualifications specific to the work or task being performed:

Appropriate qualifications and training must be registered in terms of the provisions of the South African Qualifications Authority Act for them to be deemed to be the required qualifications and training.

#5: Asbestos regulations require an Approved Inspection Authority for the monitoring of asbestos concentrations in the air.

#6: Lead regulations require an Approved Inspection Authority for the:

  • Monitoring of lead concentrations in the air; and
  • Analysis of blood lead or urinary lead concentrations

#7: Noise-induced hearing loss regulations require an Approved Inspection Authority for the monitoring of noise in the workplace.

#8: General machinery regulations say a competent person in relation to machinery is any person who:

  • Has served an apprenticeship in an engineering trade, which included the operation and maintenance of machinery; or
  • Has at least five years practical experience in the operation and maintenance of machinery; and
  • Who has, during or subsequent to such apprenticeship or period of practical experience, no less than one year's experience in the operation and maintenance appropriate to the class of machinery he's required to supervise.
  • Has obtained an engineering diploma in either the mechanical or electro technical (heavy current) fields with an academic qualification of at least T3 or N5, or of an equivalent level; and
  • Who has, subsequent to achieving such qualification, no less than two years' practical experience in the operation and maintenance appropriate to the class of machinery he's required to supervise.

Now that you know the difference between a competent person and Approved Inspection Authorities, make sure you use the right one.

Enjoyed this article? Subscribe to receive these free articles in your inbox daily.
 



Related articles




Related articles



Related Products



Comments
0 comments


Recommended for You 

  Quick Tax Solutions for Busy Taxpayers – 35 tax answers at a glance



Here are all the most interesting, thought-provoking and common tax questions
asked by our subscribers over the last tax year – everything from A to Z!

To download Quick Tax Solutions for Busy Taxpayers – 35 tax answers at a glance click here now >>>
  Employees always sick? How to stop it today



Make sure you develop a leave policy to regulate sick leave in your company.

BONUS! You'll find an example of the leave policy and procedure in this report.

To download Employees always sick? How to stop it today click here now >>>
  Absenteeism: Little known ways to reduce absenteeism



This FREE e-report will tell you how you can reduce absenteeism in your workplace while avoiding the CCMA and without infringing your employees' labour rights.

To download Absenteeism: Little known ways to reduce absenteeism click here now >>>
  7 Health & safety strategies to save you thousands



Don't let a health and safety incident cost you one more cent. Implement these seven
strategies in your company today.

To download 7 Health & safety strategies to save you thousands click here now >>>