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Have you told your employees that you could fire them for the following instances of insubordination?

by , 08 September 2014
Insubordination is when your employee doesn't obey a direct and specific order from you.

This is the highest form of disrespect by an employee and you need to deal with it promptly.

If you don't, you'll lose control and even employees who respect you will start to undermine your authority.

Now that's a risk you can't afford to take.

That's why we recommend you make it clear to your employees that you could fire them for the following instances of insubordination...


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Say good-bye to all your insubordination woes and discipline those insubordinate employees without worrying about the CCMA!

Get your copy of The Insubordination Toolkit: How to deal with insubordination, gross insubordination and insolence in the workplace today.

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Make sure you tell your employees that the following instances of insubordination could lead to dismissal


#1: The mere frustration with working conditions or the alleged 'insensitivity of management.

Let's say two construction workers didn't like the abrupt way their new supervisor talked to them. He didn't greet them; he just went straight to setting out the day's duties. 

As a result, the workers decide not to carry out his instructions because he didn't address them respectfully. After two weeks of refusing to carry out instructions because 'management was insensitive', they were fairly dismissed.

#2: Refusing to carry out instructions as a mechanism for pressurising you to accept a demand or request

For example, adopting a collective 'go slow' to force you to increase overtime rates – this amounts to unprocedural industrial action. You could fairly dismiss for this.

#3: Refusing to follow instructions because you (the manager) haven't heard their grievances

For example, a clerical worker, who refused to complete certain quality checklists until her manager had attended to her complaints, was fairly dismissed.

Well there you have it: Make it clear to your employees that they have a duty to listen to your instructions, and if they don't accept your authority or carry out reasonable, legal instructions, they're going against their basic employee duties and you can dismiss them for insubordination.

For more information on insubordination, check out the Labour Law for Managers Loose Leaf Service.
 


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