HomeHome SearchSearch MenuMenu Our productsOur products

Are you familiar with the general employer safety duties regarding listed work? Check out this list to be sure

by , 07 April 2015
As an employee, some safety responsibilities are yours and yours alone. Together with the power of decision, also comes great responsibility. And today we want to discuss what how this applies to activities listed under the regulations. Pay attention since this work can be harmful to your employees' health and safety.

The listed work refers to some activities which involve risks and have a work permit linked to them.

This type of work can be harmful to your health and safety so you'll need to do more than a risk assessment for this type of work.

Following is a list of the type of work that needs to be linked to a safe work permit program (not exclusive):
•  Working at heights
•  Hot work (welding, grinding etc)
•  Working over water
•  Working in confined/enclosed spaces
•  Excavation
•  Demolition
•  Explosives

Keep in mind that depending on the work your employees are doing and where they're doing it, it may be necessary to include the activities in the safe work permit program.

Here's a list of the type of work that needs to be linked to a safe work permit program (please

Make sure you have a safe work permit program and that there are safe work procedures available so your employees can do the following work safely:

Now that you know which type of work this applies to, let's look at your safety duties towards them...

Here are the general duties of employers regarding listed work:

1. Subject to such arrangements as may be prescribed, every employer whose employees undertake listed work or are liable to be exposed to the hazards emanating from listed work, shall, after consultation with the health and safety committee established for that workplace –

a. identify the hazards and evaluate the risks associated with such work constituting a hazard to the health of such employees, and the steps that need to be taken to comply with the provisions of this Act;

b. as far as is reasonably practicable, prevent the exposure of such employees to the hazards concerned or, where prevention is not reasonably practicable, minimize such exposure; and

c. having regard to the nature of the risks associated with such work and the level of exposure of such employees to the hazards, carry out an occupational hygiene programme and biological monitoring, and subject such employees to medical surveillance.

 *********** Recommended Product ***************

Your A-Z guide to doing an internal audit that meets OHSAS 18001 standards in just minutes

By law you know you have to do an internal audit of your health and safety system at least once a
year... But where do you start?

Should you call a professional and pay thousands?

Or should you attempt this mammoth task yourself?

Fear not... Today I'll tell you exactly how you can successfully perform an internal audit that meets the OHSAS 18001 standards perfectly.

Click here to find out more...

 ***************************************

2. Every employer contemplated in subsection (1) shall keep the health and safety representatives designated for their workplaces or sections of the workplaces, informed of the actions taken under subsection (1) in their respective workplaces or sections thereof and of the results of such actions: Provided that individual results of biological monitoring and medical surveillance relating to the work of the employee, shall only with the written consent of such employee be made available to any person other than an inspector, the employer or the employee concerned


Keep in mind that depending on the work you're doing and where you're doing it, it may be necessary to include the activities in the safe work permit program

Vote article

Are you familiar with the general employer safety duties regarding listed work? Check out this list to be sure
Rating:
Note: 5 of 1 vote


Related articles




Related articles



Related Products