HomeHome SearchSearch MenuMenu Our productsOur products

Did you know: Three task levels of risk determines the frequency of your safety audits? Here's how it works

by , 08 April 2015
Safety audit frequency is established under certain rather clear rules even though the risk level of certain tasks may vary and implies various activities.

The main idea in this case is that depending on the risk level you will fix the audit frequency.

Today, we're going to explain how this works so you don't miss a safety audit.

Risk levels and safety audit frequency – how does it work?

You need to know that each division, auxiliary operation and wholly owned subsidiary must be audited at least once over a one-year cycle.

As a next step, your audit team, in consultation with the OHS and Injury Management Department, shall assess each division, auxiliary operation and wholly owned subsidiary, and determine a nominal risk classification, based on the known operational risks of the organisation.

Keep in mind that there are 3 risk classifications that determine your audit frequency

Some divisions may have departments with nominal risk classifications that vary from the overall risk of the division.

The risk classifications include:

High risk:
Where multiple regulated hazards are present in a significant proportion of the workplace operations. For example, Construction work, electrical work, working at heights, hazardous substance, dangerous goods, hazardous building materials, regulated plant, confined spaces, hazardous manual handling and/or occupational noise.

Moderate risk:
Where only a single regulated hazard is present in a significant proportion of the workplace operations, or where multiple regulated hazards are present, but in less than a significant proportion, of the workplace operations. For example, Construction work, electrical work, working at heights, hazardous substance, dangerous goods, hazardous building materials, regulated plant, confined spaces, hazardous manual handling and/or occupational noise.

Low risk:
Where regulated hazards are generally not present in the workplace operations. This includes office-based administrative operations, and non-laboratory or workshop-based teaching/learning/research operations.

The following table describes the normal frequency of internal safety audits according to the nominal risk classification:


 *********** Recommended For You ***************

 
The easiest way to make sure you're always prepared for any health and safety meeting…

Imagine being completely prepared for every single HSE meeting without spending hours at your desk preparing. It's now possible with the templates you'll find on the HSE Representative Toolkit CD…
•    HSE committee constitution
•    HSE committee meeting agenda
•    HSE committee meeting register
•    HSE event calendar

And, now you can get access to all this without risking a single cent…

Here's how...

 ***************************************
 
This table explains how often you need to do a safety audit

Nominal Risk Classification          Nominal Audit Frequency

High Risk                                             3 Months
Moderate Risk                                     6 Months
Low Risk                                           12 Months

Pay attention to the fact that your audit team, in consultation with the OHS and Injury Management Department, may increase internal audit frequency for any audited organisation for one or more of the following reasons:

•  Significant adverse findings resulting from an internal audit;
•  Significant adverse findings resulting from an external audit;
•  Significant escalation in claims or incident frequency rate;
•  Significant escalation in regulatory activity; or
•  Other information that may indicate the OHS Management System is not performing optimally.


Vote article

Did you know: Three task levels of risk determines the frequency of your safety audits? Here's how it works
Rating:
Note: 5 of 1 vote


Related articles




Related articles



Related Products