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One subtle tip when drawing up an employment contract

by , 10 May 2016
As you know, an employment contract is important as it governs the relationship between you and the employee.

But the employment contract is not the only document that'll regulates your relationship with the employee. And it's something you need to consider when drawing up an employment contract.

Keep reading to find out what other document regulates your relationship with your employees...

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Consider your codes, policies and procedures as well
 
Like I mentioned earlier, the employment contract is not the only document that will regulate your relationship with the employee.
 
Your codes, policies and practices, such as your disciplinary code and procedure, performance procedure, grievance procedure, IT policy etc. also have a bearing on that relationship.
 
So when drawing up the employment contract, consider whether or not you want your codes, policies and procedures to hold the status of contractual terms.
 
If you do, then you can insert the following clause in your employment contracts:
 
The employee is required to follow the codes policies and procedures put in place by the Employer from time to time which are specifically incorporated into this contract of employment. Any breach of such codes, policies and procedures will be considered as a breach of contract by the Employee.
 
NOTE: The advantage of doing this is that if the employee breaks any of your codes, polices or procedures, it can be seen as a breach of contract.
 
However, the disadvantage of this is that you'll have to first consult your employees should you wish to change any of your policies. This limits your ability to change them at your discretion.
 
But there is an alternative clause you can include to help with this! To find out what it is, page over to E 01 in your Labour Law for Managers handbook.
 
If you don't already have a copy, simply click here.  


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