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The two biggest mistakes employers make when creating health and safety procedures

by , 17 May 2016
There's no denying it: Writing an effective health and safety procedures can increase productivity throughout your company, as well as decrease any potential risks among your employees.

But even though that's obvious to employers, many of them continue to make potentially catastrophic mistakes when writing them.

So to help you avoid pitfalls when writing your own health and safety procedures, here are the two biggest mistakes employers make when writing them, along with tips on how to avoid them...

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Two biggest mistakes employers make when writing them, along with tips on how to avoid them…

Mistake#1: Irrelevant procedures

There is nothing worse than creating general health and safety procedures in a workplace where each task has unique risks.

For example, there's no point making an employee, who works with chemicals, follow the same health and safety procedure as an employee who cuts wood.

Yes, this is will require more effort when writing your procedures. But trust me, the work you'll have to go through, should a workplace incident occur, will be far more stressful!

REMEMBER: Relevance is important! So make your procedures specific to each task performed in your workplace, and ensure they take into consideration the unique risks each of those tasks pose.

MISTAKE#2: Disregarding the reading levels of the targeted audience

When it comes to your health and safety procedures, your 'target audience' is your employees. Therefore, you should adapt your procedures to their reading levels.

REMEMBER: There's no point writing eloquently written procedures if your ground-floor workers can't understand what on earth you're saying! So keep it simple and as uncomplicated as possible.

NOTE: You must also consider whether or not they can fully understand your medium of instruction (language in the workplace).

If not, you may have to get a translator in to translate your health and safety procedures.


*Those were the two biggest mistakes employers make when drawing up their health and safety procedures, along with what you can do to avoid them. Ensure you're implementing those tips today.

To learn more, page over to Chapter H 04: Health and Safety Procedures, in your Health and Safety Advisor handbook, or click here to order your copy today. 

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