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Use these four checklists to guarantee successful induction this January!

by , 06 January 2014
Do you have new employees joining you this January? If so, make sure you induct them correctly into your company. Why? Doing so will help ensure they're more productive and effective quicker. Use these four checklists to guarantee successful induction...

Want to ensure 2014 is off to a good start for your new employees? Make sure you induct them as soon as possible.

The Practical Guide to Human Resources Management says an induction plan will ensure:

  • An employee will be more productive sooner.
  • You'll reduce CCMA referrals if the employee knows the rules, codes of conduct and company procedures.
  • You can measure his performance sooner, as he'll understand his job better.
  • An employee will know whom to consult if they have problems.

Use these four checklists to ensure your induction is a success

Checklist 1: Ask your employee to complete this checklist to ensure you've conducted the induction successfully, and keep it on file.

  • Employee name:
  • Department:
  • Date of employment:
  • Manager responsible:
  • Personal details:

Documents and information required:

  • Copy of ID
  • Bank details
  • Qualifications
  • Home address
  • Home telephone number
  • Change of personal details

Documents given and explained:

Job information:

Office lay-out:

  • Parking and entry to building
  • Reception area and key areas of the building
  • Access to building
  • Telephone numbers and email addresses
  • Introduction to staff
  • Email sent out to all staff introducing new recruit
  • Fax and photo-copy machines


Training:

  • On the job training: with whom and by when
  • Any other necessary training

Terms and conditions of service:

  • Hours of duties, core hours and flexible working hours
  • Payroll information
  • Leave provisions and application for leave
  • Sick leave policy and notification rules
  • Have you read all of the company policies and procedures?

Checklist 2: Items to include in your company induction

Tick the areas that you want to include in the induction (add to the list if there are additional elements in your company).

General company information

  • Timings and induction training overview
  • Essential 'visitor level' safety and emergency procedures
  • Smoking areas and policy
  • Company history and background overview
  • Ethics and philosophy
  • Mission statement(s)
  • Company overview and structure
  • Local structure if applicable
  • Who's who (names, roles, responsibilities)
  • Site layout
  • Other sites and locations
  • Dress codes
  • Basic communications overview
  • Facilities and amenities
  • Pay (how, when, bonuses, 13th cheques, etc)
  • Absenteeism and lateness
  • Holidays
  • Sickness
  • Health insurance
  • Pension / Provident Fund
  • Trades Unions
  • Rights and legal issues
  • Personnel systems and records overview
  • Access to personal data
  • Time and attendance system
  • Security
  • Transport and parking
  • Creche and childcare
  • Grievance procedures
  • Discipline procedures
  • Awards and Incentives
  • Health and Safety, and hazard reporting
  • General administration
  • Restricted areas, access, passes

Checklist 3: Items to include in your department induction

Tick the areas that you want to include in the induction (add to the list if there are additional elements in your company).

Department induction:

  • Department amenities, catering, washrooms, etc.
  • Emergency procedures
  • Department structure
  • Department tour
  • Department functions and aims
  • Team and management
  • Department personnel overview (extremely helpful, but be careful to avoid sensitive or judgemental issues)
  • Related departments and functions
  • The work-flow - what are we actually here to do?
  • Customer service standards and service flow
  • How the job role fits into the service or production process
  • Reporting, communications and management structures
  • Virtual teams, groups, projects open to job role
  • Social activities and clubs
  • Initial induction de-brief and feedback
  • Wider site and amenities tour
  • Smoking areas and policy
  • Basic communications overview
  • Career paths
  • Training and development
  • Appraisals
  • Mentoring
  • Other housekeeping issues
  • General department administration
  • Restricted areas, access, passes

Checklist 4: Items to include in your individual induction

Tick the areas that you want to include in the induction (add to the list if there are additional elements in your company).

Individual induction

  • Politics, protocols and unwritten rules
  • Terminology, jargon, glossary, definitions of local terms
  • Use and care of issued equipment
  • Work space or workstation
  • Local housekeeping
  • Stationery and supplies
  • Job description – duties, authority, scope, area/coverage/territory
  • Expectations, standards, current priorities
  • Use of job specific equipment, tools.
  • Use of job specific materials, substances, consumables
  • Handling and storage
  • Technical training - sub-categories as appropriate
  • Product training - sub-categories as appropriate
  • Services training - sub-categories as appropriate
  • Job specific health and safety training
  • Job-specific administration, processing.
  • Performance reporting
  • Performance evaluation
  • Training needs analysis and next steps
  • Initial training plans after induction
  • Training support, assistance, mentor support
  • Where to go, who to call, who to ask for help and


Advice:
 

  • Start of one-to-one coaching
  • Training review times and dates
  • Development of personal objectives and goals
  • Opportunities for self-driven development
  • Other housekeeping issues


Remember to use these checklists as a guideline. Apply what's relevant to your company and add things that are missing from the list.
'Inductions should not start and finish on the first day of employment. Ideally, it's a continuous process that should start from the moment a candidate accepts the job and finish when the employee is fully integrated into the company,' says the Communications Council.

'This is a valuable process to go through. It will empower the employee to be more successful and ensure loyalty to the business sooner.'

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