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10 items an effective job description must contain

by , 10 June 2016
Job descriptions are useful as they help you:

· manage employee performance:
· Achieve job clarity;
· Identify, measure and manage key performance areas; and
· Justify differences in income based on job value.

But all this can only be achieved if your job description contains the following 10 items.

Keep reading to find out what they are...

*****MUST HAVE*****

The A-Z of legal recruitment

Did you know there are 11 legal requirements for recruitment?
 
Do you know how the Employment Equity Act affects your job advertisement?
 
Do you know what checks you can legally conduct on an applicant?
 
Are you sure your employment contract includes the 16 clauses the law says you must have?
 
If you don't have all of these aspects correct, you'll be on the wrong side of the law when it comes to your recruitment process.

**********************
 
 

The 10 items an effective job description must contain are…

 
ITEM#1: Job title

TIP: Whatever you do, don't go changing job titles to make them sound important! As this can change the nature and value of the job.

So, for example, don't use the term 'office manager' to describe a secretary as this could lead to complications when trying to justify income differentials.  

ITEM#2: Department

It's very important for you to include the department which the job falls into.

For example, even though some of their duties may be the same, the overall job description of a Finance Secretary will be very different from an HR Secretary.

So be sure to include the departments for the job.

ITEM#3: Division

This is a very important item if your company has many divisions, as there may be unique requirements within each of them.

For example, the administrator in one division may be required to co-ordinate meetings while the administrator of another division may not be required to do so.

ITEM#4: Responsible supervisor

You should put the job title of the employee's immediate supervisor.

NOTE: Don't put the name of the supervisor, but instead just put the job title. Because at the end of the day, the employee will report to the job title, regardless of who exactly is in it.

ITEM#5: Responsible manager

This will be the person who approves the job description.

This could be the responsible supervisor, or someone else, such as the HR manager or Head of Department.
 

*To see what the last five items are, simply page over to Chapter J 02: Job Descriptions, in your Practical Guide to Human Resources Management handbook, or click here to order your copy today. 


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