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Could the cause of the Tongaat Mall collapse be your company's undoing too?

by , 29 July 2014
As a contractor, you know you're liable for anything that goes wrong with that building. Like if it collapses like the Tongaat Mall did.

Essentially you're responsible, not just for the health and safety of your employees who constructed the building, but for the safety of everyone who uses it afterwards too.

And if your new building project has structural issues like the Tongaat Mall did, it could be the undoing of your whole company...

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The problems at the Tongaat Mall happened because no one tested the strength of the concrete

 
The Tongaat Mall collapsed because several support pillars crumbled. This happened because no one did strength and hardness testing on these pillars. 
 
If someone had tested the strength of the concrete pillars, they would have been able to prevent this disaster.
 
So ask yourself, do you know if anyone has tested the durability of the concrete supports on your construction site? 
 
If not, it could result in a disaster like the Tongaat Mall collapse and be the downfall of your whole company.
 
You can prevent this though, by following these five steps...
 

Five steps you must follow to ensure you've tested the strength of the concrete supports on your construction site

 
Step #1: As the head contractor, you must do the concrete testing yourself. Arrange a time to test the support structures and ask your construction managers to join you.
 
Step #2: Choose an appropriate testing method to determine the strength of the concrete.
 
Step #3: Gather the tools you need for the test method you chose and carry it out.
 
Step #4: Observe and record the results of the tests.
 
Step #5: Discuss the rest of the tests with your construction managers and agree on whether the supports are structurally sound or not.
 
If you decided they aren't strong enough, instruct your employees to remake the supports. Then repeat this testing process until the supports are strong enough.
 
By following these steps, you'll be sure to avoid a disaster from being the downfall of your company. 
 


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